Ambiguity and exegesis: confusing English words

My last blogpost highlighted the mistake that early Christians made between 'soon' and 'suddenly'.  It continues to the present hour, even among academia, with serious practical consequences both to the early Christian church 2Th 3:11 and to current Christianity. There are other examples of ambiguity in English words leading to confusion in exegesis.  Such an …

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Hebrew or Aramaic?

Bible commentators and academics are in the habit of describing the native language spoken by Jesus and His contemporaries as Aramaic or Syro-Chaldaic.  Those who wish to show their academic credentials will do the same.  This is servile copying of academia. The New Testament repeatedly calls it Hebrew Lk 23:38, Jn 5:2, Jn 19:13,17,20, Act …

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When did the Gospel first reach Europe?

It is common to hear preachers say that the Gospel first came to Europe when Paul responded to the Macedonian call, ‘Come over into Macedonia and help us’ Act 16:9.  This is wrong, and it is one of many manifestations of the readiness to copy ideas without checking out if they are true. The Gospel …

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Academic exegesis

Academic exegesis is that form of interpretation which copies academics or authority figures rather than doing proper exegesis. The Lord Jesus Christ cut through this in His teaching, so that people were astonished at His teaching. Academic exegesis is seen in the translation of various biblical passages.  Current Bible versions are the product of teams …

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